This is an example of the way words look in a simple early reader modified in Noah Text (Rimes + Long Vowels)*:

Relevant Data

Product Description

This information is brought to you by Noah Text (patent pending).

  • Half of the English language is of foreign origin making our writing system extremely complex.
  • In 2007, only 1/3 of U.S. eighth graders could read and write at a proficient level.
  • In 2007, only 68.8% of U.S. children graduated from high school.
  • Countries throughout the world are continuing to outrank the U.S. in education decreasing our global competitiveness.     

Noah Text comes in several versions to give educators and individuals optimum flexibility.

Early Readers – Noah Text (Rimes + Long Vowels)*
For maximum benefit.

Early Readers – Noah Text (Just Rimes)*
For slightly more skilled readers.

Chapter Books – Noah Text (Syllables + Long Vowels)
For maximum benefit.

Chapter Books – Noah Text (Just Syllables)
For slightly more skilled readers.

Chapter Books – Plain Text
For proficient readers.

Noah Text is currently endorsed by Educational Diagnostician and Consultant, Dr. Miriam Cherkes-Julkowski, which she outlines in a letter at the beginning of each book. As well, Noah Text falls within the National Reading Panel’s guidelines of evidence-based reading instruction and can be used as an instructional scaffold. 

*Note: The word “rime” is a linguistic term and refers to the pattern of letters starting with the vowel and going to the end of the syllable.

Noah Text is a specialized text designed to help new readers, struggling readers, and those with dyslexia.  It was designed based on the fact that the English writing system is one of the most irregular writing systems in the world, requiring two to three times more instruction time and practice compared to most other languages.  Noah Text “simulates” what predictable regular languages already do by allowing for self-teaching.  Noah Text guides the reader toward the most critical information within our writing system – patterns - bringing predictability to a system that is otherwise unpredictable.  It alleviates the burdens an irregular writing system puts on working memory and increases both fluency and speed, thus, creating a more fluid and relaxed independent reading experience. 

Predictable written languages have clear syllable breaks, and predictable vowel patterns. The importance of this is obvious. When we don’t know a word, those are the first things we look for. Thus, to “simulate” a predictable language, we must simply highlight these important factors.  We highlight syllable breaks and accentuate long vowels, similar to an acute accent mark, which is used in many languages.  We also highlight patterns within one syllable words. We do all this while keeping the words intact. The result is this: 

This is an example of the way words look in a higher level book modified in Noah Text (Syllables + Long Vowels):

Noah Text